OG Houses

Oak Grove Boys School : Houses

Old name

 

Current Name
Roberts :

Field Marshal Frederick Sleigh Roberts, 1st Earl Roberts, VC, KG, KP, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCIE, KStJ, VD, and PC (30 September 1832 – 14 November 1914) was a British soldier who was one of the most successful commanders of the 19th century. He served in the Indian Rebellion, the Expedition to Abyssinia and the Second Anglo-Afghan War before leading British Forces to success in the Second Boer War. He also became the last Commander-in-Chief of the Forces before the post was abolished in 1904.

 

Ashoka:

Emperor Ashoka the Great lived from 304 to 232 BCE and was the third ruler of the Indian Mauryan Empire, the largest ever in the Indian subcontinent. He ruled form 268 BCE to 232 BCE and became a model of kingship in the Buddhist tradition. Under Ashoka India had an estimated population of 30 million, much higher than any of the contemporary Hellenistic kingdoms. After Ashoka’s death, however, the Mauryan dynasty came to an end and its empire dissolved.

Kitchener:

 

Field Marshal Horatio Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener ,KG, KP, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE, PC,  ( 24 June 1850 – 5 June 1916) was a senior British Army officer and colonial administrator who won notoriety for his imperial campaigns, most especially his scorched earth policy against the Boers and his establishment of concentration camps during the Second Boer War, and also played a central role in the early part of the First World War.

 

Patel:

Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel (31 October 1875 – 15 December 1950) was the first Deputy Prime Minister of India. He was an Indian barrister and statesman, a leader of the Indian National Congress and a founding father of the Republic of India who played a leading role in the country’s struggle for independence and guided its integration into a united, independent nation. In India and elsewhere, he was often addressed as Sardar which means Chief in Hindi, Urdu, and Persian. He promoted the Quit India Movement.

Haig:

Field Marshal Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig, KT, GCB, OM, GCVO, KCIE (19 June 1861 – 29 January 1928) was a senior officer of the British Army. During the First World War, he commanded the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) on the Western Front from late 1915 until the end of the war. He was commander during the Battle of the Somme, the battle with one of the highest casualties in British military history, the Third Battle of Ypres, and the Hundred Days Offensive, which led to the armistice of 11 November 1918.

 

Shivaji:

Chhatrapati Shivaji was one of the bravest, most progressive and sensible rulers of India. The founder of the Maratha Kingdom, he was born to be a natural leader and fighter on 19th February, 1630 in the prestigious Shivneri Fort.

Shivaji established a royal name for himself in history with his administrative skills by upholding the Swarajya values and the Maratha heritage. He was known for his bravery and tactics with which he won numerous wars against the Mughals.

Wellington:

Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (1 May 1769 – 14 September 1852), was an Anglo-Irish soldier and statesman who was one of the leading military and political figures of 19th-century Britain. His defeat of Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 put him in the top rank of Britain’s military heroes.

Tagore:

Rabindranath Tagore is best known as a poet but he was a man of many talents. He was the first Indian to win a Nobel for Literature. He was a philosopher and educationist who established a university that challenged conventional education.

Tagore was a painter who played an important role in modernising Bengali art. In addition, he was a nationalist who gave up his knighthood to protest British policies in colonial India after the Jallianwala Bagh massacre.

 

PS:      Roberts / (NELSON)      Some records have Nelson instead of Roberts.

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   Oak Grove Girls School: The Old Houses were name after Counties in UK

York

Gloucester

Kent 

New / Current Names

Mirabai:

Meera, also known as Meera Bai or Mirabai, was a 16th-century Hindu mystic poet and devotee of Krishna. She is a celebrated Bhakti saint, particularly in the North Indian Hindu tradition. Meera Bai was born into a Rajput royal family of Kudki district of Pali, Rajasthan, India.

Sarojini:

Sarojini Naidu was an Indian independence activist, poet and politician. A renowned orator and accomplished poet, she is often known by the moniker ‘The Nightingale of India’. As a prodigious child, Naidu wrote the play “Maher Muneer”, which earned her a scholarship to study abroad. She became the second woman president of the Indian National Congress. She was the first woman Governor of an Indian state after independence. Her collection of poems earned her literary acclaim.

 

Padmini:

Rani Padmini, also known as Padmavati, is believed to be a 13th century Indian queen. Padmini was a legendary 13th-14th century Indian queen (Rani). Padmavati was an exceptionally beautiful princess of the Singhal kingdom (Sri Lanka). Ratan Sen, the Rajput ruler of Chittor, heard about her beauty from a talking parrot named Hiraman. After an adventurous quest, he married her and brought her to Chittor. Alauddin Khilji, the Sultan of Delhi also heard about her beauty, and attacked Chittor to obtain her. Meanwhile, Ratan Sen was killed in a combat with Devpal, the king of Kumbhalner who was also enamoured with Padmavati’s beauty. Before Alauddin Khilji could capture Chittor, Padmavati and her companions committed Jauhar (self-immolation) to protect their honour.